Nutritional Facts Bell Peppers

What is Bell Pepper?

The bell pepper is the fruit of plants in the Grossum cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum. Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent chili varieties as “sweet peppers”.

The color of bell peppers changes from green to yellow, orange, and red the longer it is allowed to mature on the plant. Green peppers feature a more bitter flavor profile. Orange and yellow bell peppers are sweeter, with the sweetest being the red bell pepper.

Benefits of bell peppers:

1. Packed with vitamins, minerals, and other plant compounds.

They are an excellent source of vitamin C, especially the ripest peppers, which are red. Peppers are also a good source of vitamin A, as well as vitamin B6, folic acid, and fiber. Bell peppers also have antioxidant properties, which may help to protect against diseases such as cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

As for which bell pepper is the healthiest, red peppers. They are low in potassium and high in flavor, but that’s not the only reason they’re perfect for the kidney diet, they pack the most nutrition because they’ve been on the vine longest.

Green peppers are harvested earlier before they have a chance to turn yellow, orange, and then red. Compared to green bell peppers, the red ones have almost 11 times more beta-carotene and 1.5 times more Vitamin C.

Green peppers are high in iron, but they’re also rich in Vitamin C, which can help your body absorb iron more efficiently. This combination makes green peppers a superfood when it comes to preventing and treating iron-deficient anemia.

2. Eye health

Lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids found in relatively high amounts in bell peppers — may improve eye health when consumed in adequate amounts

In fact, they protect your retina — the light-sensitive inner wall of your eye — from oxidative damage.

Consumption of foods rich in these carotenoids may cut the risk of both cataracts and macular degeneration.

Thus, adding bell peppers to your diet may help lower your risk of visual impairments.

3. Anemia prevention

Anemia is a common condition characterized by a reduced ability of your blood to carry oxygen.

One of the most common causes of anemia is iron deficiency, the main symptoms of which are weakness and tiredness.

Not only are red bell peppers a decent source of iron they are also exceptionally rich in vitamin C, which increases the absorption of iron from your gut.

In fact, one medium-sized red bell pepper may contain 169% of the RDI for vitamin C.

Dietary iron absorption increases significantly when you consume fruits or vegetables high in vitamin C.

For this reason, eating raw bell peppers alongside iron-rich foods — such as meat or spinach — may help increase your body’s iron stores, cutting your risk of anemia.

Nutrition facts

Fresh, raw bell peppers are mainly composed of water (92%). The rest is carbs and small amounts of protein and fat.

The main nutrients in 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of raw, red bell peppers are

  • Calories: 31
  • Water: 92%
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Carbs: 6 grams
  • Sugar: 4.2 grams
  • Fiber: 2.1 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams

Carbohydrates

Bell peppers are primarily composed of carbs, which account for most of their calorie content — with 3.5 ounces (100 grams) holding 6 grams of carbs.

The carbs are mostly sugars — such as glucose and fructose — which are responsible for the sweet taste of ripe bell peppers.

Bell peppers also contain small amounts of fiber — 2% by fresh weight. Calorie for calorie, they are a very good fiber source.

Vitamins and minerals

Bell peppers are loaded with various vitamins and minerals.

  • Vitamin C. One medium-sized red bell pepper provides 169% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for vitamin C, making it one of the richest dietary sources of this essential nutrient.
  • Vitamin B6. Pyridoxine is the most common type of vitamin B6, which is a family of nutrients important for the formation of red blood cells.
  • Vitamin K1. A form of vitamin K, also known as phylloquinone, K1 is important for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Potassium. This essential mineral may improve heart health.
  • Folate. Also known as vitamin B9, folate has a variety of functions in your body. Adequate folate intake is very important during pregnancy.
  • Vitamin E. A powerful antioxidant, vitamin E is essential for healthy nerves and muscles. The best dietary sources of this fat-soluble vitamin are oils, nuts, seeds, and vegetables.
  • Vitamin A. Red bell peppers are high in pro-vitamin A (beta carotene), which your body converts into vitamin A.

Other plant compounds

Bell peppers are rich in various antioxidants — especially carotenoids, which are much more abundant in ripe specimens.

The main compounds in bell peppers are:

Are Bell peppers healthier cooked or raw?

Raw red peppers provide more vitamin C because vitamin C breaks down with heat. But other antioxidants like carotenoids and ferulic acid go up when red peppers are cooked. … Do not boil red peppers—boiling red peppers loses the most nutrients and antioxidants.

As a rule, the more colorful, sweeter peppers are better for eating raw; the green pepper, with its less sweet taste, is better for cooking.

Peppers make a great, flavorful addition to many meals. Whether you sauté bell peppers to add to stir-fry, slice them up to pack as an on-the-go crunchy snack, or use chili peppers to add some spice to your meals, you probably keep them as a fridge staple.

If you like peppers, enjoy them as much as you like—you can eat them every day or even at every meal, says Rizzo.

However, it’s important to eat everything in moderation. According to the USDA, one serving of raw bell pepper is 3.5 ounces (100 grams), which is about half of bell pepper.

Summary:

Bell peppers are mainly made up of water and carbs. Most of the carbs are sugars, such as glucose and fructose. Bell peppers are also a decent source of fiber.

Bell peppers are very high in vitamin C, with a single one providing up to 169% of the RDI. Other vitamins and minerals in bell peppers include vitamin K1, vitamin E, vitamin A, folate, and potassium.

Bell peppers contain many healthy antioxidants, including capsanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, quercetin, and luteolin. These plant compounds are associated with many health benefits.

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Please let us know in the comments below:

  1. Do you eat Bell pepper? If so, which one is your favorite?
  2. Do you have a certain illness that is helped by the consumption of bell pepper? If so, what is it?
  3. Do you have other ways of preparing bell peppers?

Disclaimer

Information on this site is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We encourage you to do your own research. Seek the advice of a medical professional before making any changes to your lifestyle or diet.

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References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_pepper

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/bell-peppers

https://hop.clickbank.net/?affiliate=DIVINEALL&vendor=nthrv&r=vitaminc

 

 

 

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